• Language
    • ENGLISH
    • GERMAN
    • SPANISH
    • FRENCH
    • ITALIAN
    • JAPANESE
    • PORTUGUESE
    • CHINESE
    • RUSSIAN

Get your own Little Black Book.

Build your own personal news stream. Discover the latest work created that interests you, share your favourite stories and follow your favourite people and companies

Already have an account?

The Directors

The Directors: Cyprien Clément-Delmas

Rekorder director on the joys of challenging scripts, standing out from the crowd and the task of choreographing a war dance with two army tanks

The Directors: Cyprien Clément-Delmas

Cyprien is a french director and photographer with a heart for relevant topics. He is constantly diving deep into the communities he's working with, from sensitive documentaries to entertaining commercials, always portraying them with accuracy, sensitivity and respect.

His joy for the craft and his sharp eye and personality get him to shoot fun creative campaigns, short films and music videos. He has worked with a range of well-known clients including Puma, Ray-Ban, i-D Magazine, Converse, Adidas and Zalando.


Name: Cyprien Clément-Delmas

Location: France/Spain

Repped by/in: Caviar (UK), Canada (Spain), Phantasm (France) & Rekorder (Germany)

Awards: BFFF, nomintation YDA, etc


LBB> What elements of a script sets one apart from the other and what sort of scripts get you excited to shoot them?

Cyprien> The visual energy, the concept, the creative approach are the first things I look for. I love to shoot highly visual, vibrant and challenging scripts.


LBB> How do you approach creating a treatment for a spot?

Cyprien> First, I conceptualise (what is the concept behind and how to improve it), then I visualise (how to express this concept visually) and finally I push it to see if I can do something that is new, different or impactful.


LBB> If the script is for a brand that you're not familiar with/ don’t have a big affinity with or a market you're new to, how important is it for you to do research and understand that strategic and contextual side of the ad? If it’s important to you, how do you do it?

Cyprien> It’s important to ask for as much information as the agency. Then, I try no to be too influenced by the previous spots or creativities. Because, nobody calls you to do the same as before.

Sometimes, I don’t even look at their ads so I can have a fresh start, a fresh look.


LBB> For you, what is the most important working relationship for a director to have with another person in making an ad? And why?

Cyprien> The most important is a respectful relationship. There is some truth in every opinion and you should be able to find it. Then of course you have to be exigent with your team and push then but always being fair to them.

 

LBB> What type of work are you most passionate about - is there a particular genre or subject matter or style you are most drawn to?

Cyprien> I love the casting process and finding the perfect characters, actors or non-actors for the film. Then, I’m enjoying location scouting a lot as it’s most of the time the first clear piece of the puzzle when I create a film. Finally, I love the editing process as it’s where the film comes to life. I used to sit down with the editor all the time.


LBB> What misconception about you or your work do you most often encounter and why is it wrong?

Cyprien> A film is a creative process, especially when you work with reality and real people, and a process needs time. Sometimes, people ask you to have it all clear in your mind from the very first minute. But it doesn’t work like this. You need time. During the prep, you put all the pieces one by one together like a puzzle. You need to see the location, the cast, the props, etc, to fully visualise.

That’s why I’m creating the film in my mind until the shoot day and during. It’s getting clearer, solid and you finally make magic. 


LBB> Have you ever worked with a cost consultant and if so how have your experiences been?

Cyprien> No


LBB> What’s the craziest problem you’ve come across in the course of a production – and how did you solve it?

Cyprien> Finding two army tanks to make them dance a choreography for my music video 'War Dance'! My producer Javier Alejandro found near London fans of Tanks that had 80 in their private field. A crazy experience and fun shoot we all remember.


LBB> How do you strike the balance between being open/collaborative with the agency and brand client while also protecting the idea?

Cyprien> What I’ve learned with the time is that creatives are just creative people like us. They love to imagine, brainstorm, challenge ideas as much as we do and as a director you should embrace this creative and positive energy for the project. Of course, I’ve been lucky to work with agencies that push boundaries and are super respectful and open to the director’s vision. I’m less in contact with the clients but you should always listen and try to understand their concerns or fears if they have some. Reassure them or find good solutions.


LBB> What are your thoughts on opening up the production world to a more diverse pool of talent? Are you open to mentoring and apprenticeships on set?

Cyprien> Yes for sure. Very open. I’ve been teaching film directing and photography for years to youngsters and young professionals. I love to share my experience and my anecdotes.

 

LBB> How do you feel the pandemic is going to influence the way you work into the longer term? Have you picked up new habits that you feel will stick around for a long time?

Cyprien> We work even more remotely which is good I think. No new habits. I feel this was already the way I worked before, it’s just a bit more.

 

LBB> Your work is now presented in so many different formats - to what extent do you keep each in mind while you're working (and, equally, to what degree is it possible to do so)? 

Cyprien> I think it’s sometimes too much what we intend to extract from one shot. I think it’s better to have one main format and then the other ones are secondary. You always need to prioritise a format or an outcome.


LBB> What’s your relationship with new technology and, if at all, how do you incorporate future-facing tech into your work? 

Cyprien> All this technology is coming step by step but the truth is that it’s a minority. I remember maybe two super interesting scripts with data driven info and interactive storytelling. No more. I’m personally very interested by VR as a user and as a director. There is a lot to explore there.


LBB> Which pieces of work do you feel really show off what you do best – and why? 

Cyprien> Paris Go Zones

War Dance

INDIGO NIGHT Tamino - Indigo Night

Puma - Afrojuice

Sign up to our newsletters and stay up to date with the best work and breaking ad news from around the world.